Mission Bell Reclaimed

There is a richness and warmth that comes from using wood that has been previously used or has been saved from being discarded. Most reclaimed or salvaged wood has unparalleled architectural quality and character - and often an interesting story that makes it especially attractive for projects.

Wood with a Story
Georgia Pacific Redwood

Sprawling between Main Street and the wind-raked ocean bluffs, the Georgia Pacific lumber mill was Fort Bragg’s economic center for generations until it closed in 2002. Not only was the framework of the community shaped and built by the Mill, but the very materials used to build the plant were taken from the fabric of the land surrounding the mill. The Pacific Northwest is one of the only habitats on the planet for Redwood trees and the great Sequoias. The North Coast essentially built San Francisco twice; once before and once after the 1906 Earthquake and the Great Fire.

The mill, originally founded in 1885 as the Union Lumber Company, once employed 2,000 people. It was severely damaged by the earthquake in 1906 but it was rebuilt. Later, it was extensively renovated in the late 1930’s. In the decades from 1940 to 1960 it produced 500,000 board feet per day utilizing two shifts. In 1972, Georgia-Pacific Corporation took over the business. Unfortunately the lumber business fell on hard times, and the mill only had one profitable year from 1994 to 2002. Georgia Pacific officials blamed regulations, a dwindling supply of large trees, depressed prices and the emergence of synthetic alternatives to redwood. Its closure in 2002 marked the end of an era. The wood that made up the mill has been removed and is now available for new projects. Mission Bell has acquired substantial amounts of Douglas Fir and California Redwood.

Transbay Terminal Douglas Fir

San Francisco’s Transbay Terminal was completed in 1939 at First and Mission Streets as the terminal for East Bay trains using the newly opened Bay Bridge. The Terminal was designed to handle as many as 35 million people annually, with ten car trains arriving every 63.5 seconds. In its heyday, the terminal’s rail system served 26 million passengers annually. After the war ended and gas rationing was eliminated, the Terminal’s use began to steadily decline to a rate of four to five million people traveling by rail per year. In 1958, the lower deck of the Bay Bridge was converted to automobile traffic only, the Key System was dismantled and by 1959 the inter-modal Transbay.

Terminal was converted into a bus-only facility. A completely new Transbay Terminal complex is currently underway, and the foundation pilings for the original Transbay Terminal have been removed. The foundation pilings consisted of 40' long.

Douglas Fir logs driven into the ground by a steam powered pile driver. Mission Bell is pleased to be able to make this beautiful reclaimed Douglas Fir available for new projects. We have logs with weathered exterior and tight knots. Some logs have slight green/blue/grey mineral coloration. All are available from existing logs to fresh lumber.

Cumberland Oak

Known for bourbon distilleries, tobacco farming, bluegrass music, and of course, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Kentucky and the surrounding area has some of the best of what America has to offer. Reflecting what made this region great are the majestic Oak barns indicative of a once booming agrarian economy. Standing strong for over 70-80 years, these barns were once used to dry tobacco leaves, house whiskey barrels for aging bourbon, or protect livestock and food from the changing seasons. Scattered throughout the Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia region, the barns were built using the native Oak, most notably from the beautiful Cumberland Mountain range.

As time passed and the culture changed, the barns that once helped build the South slowly became vacant. Tobacco became less popular and the spirits industry shifted from bourbon to other alcohols, like Vodka. As a result, farmers began transitioning to new crops and other sources of income to make a living.

The good news is our rich agricultural past now yields an opportunity to revive the wood that once helped build America. This wood has a character and a story like no other. Each piece has a patina that is rich in brown and gray coloring. As we searched the country for outdated and unused structures, we carefully collected this material to help build a rich reclaimed and recycled future.

Kentucky Horse Fence Oak

In Central Kentucky, there are miles and miles of roads lined with black four-board fences. It’s not clear who decided that fences in this area would be black, or why. It’s been said that the black fences in Central Kentucky are the result of a ‘keeping up with the Joneses’ scenario. The owner of one farm who had a connection to the asphalt industry painted his fences with the sticky black pitch, almost as an advertisement for the diversity of the product, and before long his neighbors were following suit.

It’s hard to say if that’s the real reason but nevertheless, it seems that there are advantages of black paint. It lasts longer and contrasts beautifully with the rolling green hills. If you visit the region, you’ll see men spraying fences along the road completely covered with black, their eyes peeking out over bandannas covering their noses and mouths. Over time the boards grow weathered and eventually are replaced. We are fortunate to have a fair amount of this storied wood. Whether you decide to leave it rough or sand it down, the hint of black paint reveals its previous use.

Wine Wood
California Wine Tank Redwood

Founded in 1966, Robert Mondavi is one of the younger wine makers in the Napa Valley region. Although young, the winery has been recognized for producing some of the most acclaimed wines, especially with their Cabernet Sauvignon. Within one year of the winery’s inception, they created the very successful Fume Blanc, a recreation of the Sauvignon Blanc.

Beaulieu Vineyard, or BV Wine, is one of Napa Valley’s longest continually operating wineries. Founded in 1900 by Georges and Fernande de Latour, a beautiful place or “beau lieu” reflects the location in Rutherford where the winery was established. Beaulieu Vineyard’s rich history provides insight into the craft of wine-making, making them a leader in Clone Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon.

For many years, these wineries used large wooden Redwood tanks to store, ferment, and age their wines. These tanks held 30-60 thousand gallons of wine and reached up to 19 feet tall and 20 feet wide. The wine would mature in these tanks for up to two years before it was bottled.

Now however, many wineries including Robert Mondavi and Beaulieu Vineyard are transitioning from old Redwood tanks to stainless steel tanks, with economics as the main driver. The stainless steel tanks provide winemakers with more control over flavor and enable them to accelerate the aging process. This change in the industry has resulted in the availability of beautiful old growth Redwood that comes from these aged wine tanks. The Reclaimed Redwood brings beauty and a unique California history to projects that have an eye for quality and a taste for a unique story.

Mission Bell has acquired the Robert Mondavi and Beaulieu Vineyard wine holding tanks made from beautiful old growth Redwood.

Martini & Prati Douglas Fir

Established in 1881 as the Twin Fir Winery, the historic site is distinguished as one of the oldest wineries in continuous operation in California. In 1902, Rafael Martini – an Italian immigrant - purchased the winery and just eight years later passed the business onto his sons, Narchiso and Frank Martini. The sons continued to produce the wines that made the winery famous throughout Northern California. In 1950, Enrico Prati – long associated with the Italian Swiss Colony - joined the Martinis and formed the Martini & Prati label. For five generations, the winery prospered and in 2003 they decided to sell the business to Martin Ray Winery.

For many years, the Martini & Prati Winery used large wooden redwood tanks to store, ferment, and age their wines. These tanks each held 50-60 thousand gallons of wine and reached up to 19 feet tall and 20 feet wide. These tanks held the wine for up to two years before it was bottled.

Currently, many wineries, including the Martini & Prati Winery, are transitioning from old Redwood tanks to stainless steel tanks, with economics as the main driver. The stainless steel tanks provide wine-makers with more control over flavor and enable them to accelerate the aging process. This change in the wine industry has resulted in the availability of beautiful old growth Redwood wine staves that come from these aged wine tanks and old growth Douglas fir beams that comes from the underpinnings of the tanks.

Mission Bell is exclusively sourcing the old growth Redwood wine staves and old growth Douglas Fir underpinning beams from the Martini & Prati Winery estate. They are available now for new projects that are looking to preserve California’s wine history and have a taste for a unique story!

Martini & Prati Redwood

Established in 1881 as the Twin Fir Winery, the historic site is distinguished as one of the oldest wineries in continuous operation in California. In 1902, Rafael Martini – an Italian immigrant - purchased the winery and just eight years later passed the business onto his sons, Narchiso and Frank Martini. The sons continued to produce the wines that made the winery famous throughout Northern California. In 1950, Enrico Prati – long associated with the Italian Swiss Colony - joined the Martinis and formed the Martini & Prati label. For five generations, the winery prospered and in 2003 they decided to sell the business to Martin Ray Winery.

For many years, the Martini & Prati Winery used large wooden redwood tanks to store, ferment, and age their wines. These tanks each held 50-60 thousand gallons of wine and reached up to 19 feet tall and 20 feet wide. These tanks held the wine for up to two years before it was bottled.

Currently, many wineries, including the Martini & Prati Winery, are transitioning from old Redwood tanks to stainless steel tanks, with economics as the main driver. The stainless steel tanks provide wine-makers with more control over flavor and enable them to accelerate the aging process. This change in the wine industry has resulted in the availability of beautiful old growth Redwood wine staves that come from these aged wine tanks and old growth Douglas fir beams that comes from the underpinnings of the tanks.

Mission Bell is exclusively sourcing the old growth Redwood wine staves and old growth Douglas Fir underpinning beams from the Martini & Prati Winery estate. They are available now for new projects that are looking to preserve California’s wine history and have a taste for a unique story!

Sutter Home White Oak

On its exterior, every piece of Reclaimed Wood tells the story of where it’s been. Incorporating the wood into a project can add character, rustic appeal, beauty, and a great story that you can only get with a board that has a lived a prior life.

Sutter Home is one of the largest family-run independent wineries in the Unities States. It dates back to 1847. As with most Napa Valley wineries, Sutter Home was shut down during Prohibition and abandoned until 1948 when it was purchased by John and Mario Trinchero, immigrant brothers from New York City whose family had been active in the Italian wine business. In 1972, Bob Trinchero developed a new style of premium wine known as White Zinfindel. Few people realize that White Zinfindel was the result of a fortunate accident when in 1975, 1,000 gallons of bleed-off juice from red Zinfandel refused to ferment to dryness, retaining a substantial amount of sugar. Joe Trinchero put it aside for a time, and two weeks later tasted that the wine was sweet and had a pink color. He liked it, bottled it, and the rest is history.

By 1987, Sutter Home White Zinfandel had become the best-selling premium wine in the United States. Today Sutter Home is the fifth-largest winery in the United States. Along with many other wineries, Sutter Home is in the process of transitioning from Oak barrels, to Stainless Steel barrels with economics as the main driver. Stainless steel barrels also provide wine makers more control over flavor and enable them to accelerate the aging process. This change in the industry has resulted in the availability of beautiful wood from Aged Oak barrels. Now this reclaimed wood can bring its beauty and unique California history to projects that have an eye for quality and a taste for a unique story.