Hardwood Lumber

You have come to the right place if you are looking for hardwood lumber.  Hardwoods Inc. has been a hardwood lumber industry leader since 1926.  Our name has become synonymous with quality hardwoods.  Our network of industry relationships allows us to source wood products worldwide.  Choose Hardwoods to provide solutions to all your hardwood needs.

Hardwoods Import Division is a direct wholesale importer of tropical hardwoods from around the world and specializing in FSC certified hardwoods.

 

Domestic Hardwood

Most species are cut rough thickness 1” thru 2” in several grades.  Most species are cut on the quarter inch increment beginning at 1” inch thickness.  Some species are also available in thickness 2-1/2” thru 4 inch.

Hardwood lumber is cut to maximize the yield of the log and with the result being a random width product. Our sales representatives can assist you in determining the board footage needed for your job. 

Growing climates and soil conditions vary greatly in the USA. This results in different regions producing the same species that are dramatically different in color, texture, etc. Therefore, Hardwoods Inc tries to stock hardwood from regions that produce the best color and finest texture.  Within each species there are limitations on what thicknesses, widths, lengths and grades are available.  Certain species can be specified in rift and quarter sawn grain.

Domestic Hardwood Grains

Wood Grain - Alder Red

Alder - Red

Wood Grain - Ash

Ash

Wood Grain - Aspen

Aspen

Wood Grains - Basswood

Basswood

Wood Grain - Beech

Beech

Wood Grains - Balsa

Balsa

Wood Grains - Birch

Birch

Wood Grains - Butternut

Butternut

Wood Grains - Cedar - Aromatic

Cedar - Aromatic Red

Wood Grains - Cherry

Cherry

Wood Grains - Cottonwood

Cottonwood

Wood Grains - Cypress

Cypress

Wood Grains - Douglas Fir

Douglas Fir

Wood Grains - Hackberry

Hackberry

Wood Grains - Hickory

Hickory

Wood Grains - Maple Hard

Maple Hard

Wood Grains - Maple Soft

Maple Soft

Wood Grains - Pine Ponderosa

Pine Ponderosa

Wood Grains - Pine Sugar White

Pine Sugar White

Wood Grains - Poplar

Poplar

Wood Grains - Red Oak

Red Oak

Wood Grains - Walnut

Walnut

Wood Grains - White Oak

White Oak

Wood Grains - Willow

Willow

 

Exotic Hardwood

Growing climates and soil conditions vary greatly around the world. This results in different regions producing the same species that are dramatically different in color, texture, etc. Therefore, Hardwoods Inc purchases exotic hardwood from facilities in regions around the world that produce the best color and finest textured exotic hardwood.

FSC Certified

All Hardwoods Specialty Products branches are certified for Chain of Custody, by the Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC). We are able to source several FSC certified species direct from mill. Contact us for more details on species and grades available for prompt shipment.

Import Division

For your worldwide import sourcing needs, including the highest quality mills in Africa and South America, contact:

Hardwoods Import Lumber Division
9100-1 Lackey Road
Leland, North Carolina 28451, USA
Phone: 1-910-383-2578  Fax: 1-910-283-2580

Contact Tom Herga (Sales and Purchasing) for all of your wholesale import lumber enquiries.

Lumber Grades

We offer most of the standard grades (as defined by National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA). Our most popular grades are:

FAS

  • The best and most expensive grade. Boards 5 1/2" and wider, 8' and longer. The FAS grade includes a range of boards which yield from 83 1/3% (1O/12ths) to 100% clear wood in cuttings at least 3" wide by 7' long or 4" wide by 5' long.  FAS is graded from the worst side of the board.
  • The FAS grade will provide the user with long, wide, clear cuttings. Best suited for high quality furniture, cabinetry, interior trim, millwork, solid wood mouldings and applications where clear, wide boards are needed. 

FAS1F or Selects

  • In FAS1F ("FAS one Face") and Selects, the grade is established using both faces of the board. The best face must meet the requirements for FAS, and the reverse side must essentially grade No.1. FAS1F and Selects are virtually the same grade, except for minimum width and length. The minimum board size for Selects is 4" x 6'; and for FAS1F it is 6" x 8'.

No. 1

  • No. 1 Common will provide the user with clear cuttings of medium length and width. Best suited for furniture, cabinets, and a multitude of solid wood manufactured products. The No.1 grade includes a range of boards which will yield from 66 2/3% (8/12ths) to 83 1/3% (1O/12ths) clear wood in cuttings at least 3" wide by 3' long or 4" x 2'.
  • A typical thrift or "shop" grade. Boards are 3" and wider, 4' and longer. Provides good value, especially if relatively small pieces can be used.

No. 2

  • No. 2A Common will provide the user with short, narrow clear cuttings economically priced, for use in unexposed furniture frames, picture frames, cabinet rails and frames, parquet or strip flooring, and many other smaller solid wood components. The No. 2A Common grade includes a range of boards which will yield from 50% (6/12ths) to 66 2/3% (8/12ths) clear wood in cuttings at least 3" wide by 2' long.
  • Boards are 3" and wider, 4' and longer. Yields 50 percent clear face cuttings 3" and wider by 2' and longer. Suitable for some paneling and flooring applications.

In most cases, we can provide products to customer specifications. Contact us for more information.

Hardwood Specialty Products hardwood grades

Species of Hardwoods
Alder, Red

Source:  Pacific Coast (California and north)
Color:  Pale pinkish-brown to almost white
Pattern:  Not distinct
Characteristics:  Good working properties; strength between Red Gum and American tulipwood
Uses:  Unexposed structural parts for furniture; core stock
Availability:  Rare as veneer, limited as lumber

Ash, White

Source: Eastern USA, Lake States, New England and Central States
Color: Warm brown heartwood with narrow light brown sapwood
Pattern: Straight moderately open grain
Characteristics: Heavy, hard, strong, stiff and high shock resistance with excellent blending qualities and above average workability
Uses: Interiors, furniture, handles of tools and implements, sporting and athletic goods
Availability: Ready as veneer and lumber

Birch

Source: Canada and the USA (Lake States)
Color: Cream or light brown tinged with red, with thin, nearly white sapwood
Pattern: Both rotary and sliced, plain and often curly or wavy
Characteristics: Heavy, very strong, hard closed-grained, even texture
Uses: Furniture, interiors, interior and exterior doors, store fixtures, accssories
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber
Special Notes: As veneer the sapwood of rotary birch is sold as "white birch" and the heartwood as "red birch"; the greater volume produced is "natural birch" and contains a combination of color tones

Cedar, Aromatic

Source: Eastern USA and Southern Canada
Color: Light red with streaks of creamy white
Pattern: Soft, straight-grained with a fine, even texture; very knotty with  distinctive cedar aroma
Characteristics: Soft, easy to work but knots may present some difficulties; easy to finish, very distinctive cedar aroma
Uses: Linen and blanket chests, pencils, boxes
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber

Cherry

Source: Maine to Dakotas and Appalachians, Pennsylvania to West Virginia
Color: Light reddish-brown
Pattern: Straight-grained, satiny, some figured, small gum pockets are normal markings
Characteristics: Light, strong, rather hard, fine-grained
Uses: Fine Furniture, woodworker and engravers blocks
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber

Fir

Source: Northeastern Canada and USA to Southwest into Mexico.
Color: Heartwood varies with conditions of growth from pinkish-yellow to reddish-brown; sapwood lighter; Hem-Fir lumber is lighter and brighter in color, varying from a creamy, nearly-white to a light, straw-brown color
Pattern: Fine grained and even textured, lending formality to wood paneling, cabinets and trim
Characteristics: Dense, hard, stiff, durable, strong
Uses: Douglas Fir: Heavy duty construction such as wharves, trestles, bridge parts and commercial buildings; Hem-Fir: Solid wood doors, louvers, shutters, moulding, case goods, furniture
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber

Hickory

Source: Northeastern Canada and USA, south-west into Mexico
Color: White to cream with inconspicuous fine brown lines and tan heartwood
Pattern: Hickory is a ring porous woods, meaning that the pores of the spring wood form a well-defined ring
Characteristics: Extremely tough and resilient, quite hard and only moderately heavy
Uses: As veneers-furniture, skis and moulding and bent plywood requiring extreme strength
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber

Mahogany, African

Source: Africa (Ivory Coast, Gold Coast, French Cameroon, Cape Lopez, Nigeria)
Color: Light pink to reddish-brown and tannish-brown
Pattern: Although pores are distributed, this wood produces a very distinct, pleasing grain; the most lavish figured mahogany offered in plain stripe, broken stripe, mottle, fiddleback, fine crotches and faux swirl
Characteristics: Available in great lengths and widths, milder textured with slightly larger pores than other Mahogany species, relatively hard, works well, lightly lustrous, polishes well, durable
Uses: Interior furniture, accessories and art objects, boats
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber

Mahogany, South America

Source: Peru, Brazil, Central America (Honduras, Guatemalan, Nicaragua), Mexico, Jamica
Color: Varies from light reddish or yellowish-brown to rich, dark red, depending upon the country of origin. Mostly yellowish-tan
Pattern: A considerable variety of figures, similar to African Mahogany except crotches are not readily available; straighter grain usually
Characteristics: Lighter and softer than Cuban, extremely good strength properties, works well, stains and varnishes well, durable and decay-resistant; Central America produces more figured logs for fancy veneers
Uses: Furniture, paneling, fine joinery, boats, ships, pattern-making, exterior uses
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber

Maple, Hard

Source: USA (Lake States), Appalachians, Northwest USA, Canada
Color: Cream to light reddish-brown heartwood, thin white sapwood tinged slightly with reddish-brown
Pattern: Usually straight-grained, sometimes found highly figured with curly fiddleback, blistered, quilted, Birds Eye or burl grain, scattered over entire tree or in irregular stripes and patches
Characteristics: Heavy, hard, strong, close-grained, tough, stiff, uniform texture; excellent resistance to abrasion and indentation
Uses: Furniture, interiors, fixtures, flooring, woodenware, cutting surfaces, bakery paddles and other industrial uses, school furniture, decorative inlays and overlays
Availability: Plain Maple- readily as veneer; Figured Maple limited as veneer. Readily as lumber

Maple, Soft

Source:  USA (Lake States), Appalachians, Northwest USA, Canada
Color: Cream to light reddish-brown heartwood, thin white sapwood tinged slightly with reddish-brown
Pattern: Usually straight-grained, sometimes found highly figured with curly fiddleback, blistered, quilted, Birds Eye or burl grain, scattered over entire tree or in irregular stripes and patches
Characteristics: The soft maples are roughly 25 percent softer than the hard maples; heavy, fairly strong, close-grained, stifff, uniform texture; good resistance to  abrasion and indentation, however Hard Maple is stronger and more resistant
Uses: It is hard to believe, but the same species used for bowling alleys can also be sliced into gorgeous veneers and made into priceless musical intruments
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber

Meranti

Source: Philippine Islands
Color: Red to brown
Pattern: Ribbon stripe; interlocking grain
Characteristics: Course texture, large pores
Uses: Furniture, doors and cabinet-making
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber
Special Notes: Also called  Philippine Mahogany or Red Lauan; at about 36 pounds per cubic foot air-dry, Meranti is heavier than Honduras mahogany; it is not nearly as hard nor as strong and lacks the durability and stability of a true mahogany; you may find brittleness in some boards

Oak, Red

Source: USA (especially Appalachians), Ohio, Kentucky 
Color: Slightly redder tinge than While Oak, although difficult for an untrained eye to tell the difference
Pattern: Flake figure less prominent than white oak's
Characteristics: Slightly courser grain, with large, rounded, open pores; a little easier to finish than white oak., though both are excellent
Uses: Nearly all common uses of hardwoods, and especially popular where strength and durability are required; not for water-tight or water-resistant purposes, were white oak is the choice
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber
Special Notes: Except for source and color, Red Oak and White Oak, the two leading American species, are very similar; quarter sliced and sawn oak has an attractive figure of stripes and leafy grain caused by the distinct layers of springwood and summerwood and the large pores, especially concentrated in springwood; rift-cut oak has a fine pinstripe; rotary cut oak has a distinctive watery figure with great contract

Oak, White

Source: Eastern USA (especially Central States) and through Appalachian region 
Color: From light brown with a greyish tinge in the heartwood to shades of ochre in the sapwood
Pattern: More pronounced and longer rays than red oak, and more frequently rift-sawn for the comb-grain, pin striped figure than red oak
Characteristics: Pores are angular and very numerous and filled with glistening substrate called tyloses, which makes this wood especially suitable for water-tight containers (barrel staves) and where water resistance is required; tannic acid in the wood protects it from fungi and insects; closer grain than red oak
Uses: Nearly all common uses of hardwoods, and especially popular where strength and durability are required; for water-tight or water-resistant purposes
Availability:  Readily as veneer and lumber
Special Notes: Except for source and color, Red Oak and White Oak, the two leading American species, are very similar; quarter sliced and sawn oak has an attractive figure of stripes and leafy grain caused by the distinct layers of springwood and summerwood and the large pores, especially concentrated in springwood; rift-cut oak has a fine pinstripe. Rotary cut oak has a distinctive watery figure with great contract

Obeche

Source: West Africa
Color:  Creamy white to pale yellow
Pattern: Faintly striped when quartered
Characteristics: Soft, light weight, firm, medium grain, and even in texture
Uses: Furniture, interior fittings, joinery, flooring, boat building, and veneer and plywood
Availability: Limited as veneer

Pine, Knotty

Source:  Western - Pacific Northwest, Eastern - Eastern USA and North
Color:  Cream color to light reddish-brown with yellowish-white sapwood
Pattern:  Knotty
Characteristics: Softwood but occasionally used as cabinet wood; light, soft, not strong, close, straight-grained
Uses: Used in construction and interior finishing of buildings, lumber and veneer for furniture
Availability: Readily available as veneer or lumber

Poplar

Source: Eastern USA
Color: White to yellowish cast, sometimes with slight greenish cast, and occasionally with rather dark streaks
Pattern: Straight grain
Characteristics: Even texture, light to medium weight, excellent strength, machines easily, stable when dried, excellent gluing and resilience to splitting when nailed
Uses: As veneer for faces, cross-banding, and backs for plywood; as lumber for furniture component parts, turnery, interior trim and millwork, cabinetry, and exterior trim and siding
Availability: Readily available as veneer or lumber

Sap Gum

Source: Wide range in United States but commercial production is largely from lower Mississippi Valley
Color: Its color is pinkish white often blued by sap stains
Pattern: Plain but not very strong, usually watery
Characteristics: The interlocking grain which makes it strong and stiff, moderately heavy and closed-grained
Uses: This is a preferred species for furniture, cabinetry, paneling, doors, and interior trim
Availability: Readily available as veneer or lumber
Special Notes: Sap Gum is the sapwood portion of the Gum tree; the heartwood is referred to as Red Gum

Walnut

Source: Walnut grows throughout the United States and southern Canada, however, its commercial range is confined largely to the Central States
Color: Light grey-brown to dark purplish-brown.
Pattern: Plain to highly figured; this one species produces a greater variety of figure types than any other, approached only by mahogany; longwood (plain and quarter sliced, half-round, both plain and figured, crotches, swirls, stump wood and occasional burls)
Characteristics: Moderately heavy, very strong for its weight, exceptionally stable
Uses: Furniture, architecturally woodwork, gunstocks, novelties
Availability: Readily as veneer and lumber